Oursustainableresponsiblefishing ways

Pots and creels method

How does it work Pots and creels are traps, baited with fresh or salted fish, which are laid on the seabed and primarily used to catch shellfish. 
 

Habitat damage Pots and creels sit on the seabed so can be associated with disturbance to marine habitat but are not typically damaging.

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Long lining fishing method

How does it work Longlines can be used to capture fish in surface waters (pelagic) as well as bottom living species (demersal). 
 
Habitat damage longlines do not drag along the seabed so are not associated with damage to marine habitat.

Line fishing method

How does it work Line fishing uses hand held or mechanically operated poles with baited hooks attached. This method targets naturally schooling fish which are attracted to the surface through use of lights or the scattering of bait.
 
Habitat damage these hook and line fishing methods do not come into contact with the seabed so are not associated with damage to marine habitat.
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Drift, gill and set netting method

How does it work Passive nets are not actively towed by boats; they are either placed to drift on the prevailing currents (drift netting), hung from buoys which keep them suspended between the surface and the seabed (gill nets), or staked to the seabed (set nets). 
 
Habitat damage passive nets are not towed along the seabed so are not associated with damage to marine habitat.